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Grubbie

Incredibly complex system breaks down.Sounds as though its quite minor this time,although who knows what damage might have been done if actual real incredibly complex fighters had been on board.It probably wouldn’t compromise her ability to go to war, but it does expose her immense vulnerablity.

Michael Hernaman

are you for real, did you actually read the article,. its a prototype, there are going to be problems, she is not operational yet, thats the whole point of testing her to find out her weaknesses and remedy them so that when she is made operational, she is fully ready! “who knows what damage might have been done if actual real incredibly complex fighters had been on board” IT WAS IN A SMALL COMPARTMENT, i doubt they would have a F35 stored in there.

Callum

Easiest option is to just ignore Grubbie, Michael. He’s just one of our resident pessimistic trolls, if he actually believed what he posts he wouldn’t even be on the site

Sam

Grubbie probably works for the penny pinching treasury….maybe Grubbie is Really John Nott….lol

Grubbie

Check out your own comments below to see what happens without critical voices who are prepared to take on the military industrial complex, glamour projects and I’m sorry to say widespread corruption.

Grubbie

Where did you get the “IT WAS IN A SMALL COMPARTMENT “information from?

Dave

Article says flooding restricted to several small compartments…. less than 200tons of water. 1ton = ~1 meter cubed. Assume compartment is 2m high then that much water would fill one 10m x 10m compartment or four 5m x 5m compartments.

Grubbie

Now it does

Robert

QE is not really a prototype, because that would imply she will be thrown away when testing is finished. Also, though the amount of water has been described as small, I haven’t seen anything describing the size of the affected compartment.

I think the Royal Navy are hurting themselves by their media handling. Their web site and publicity is of a ship commissioned and “has already been accepted to the fleet” yet they then want to downplay and teething problems with “our nation’s flagship”. If they were smarter they would lead with the news article about QE “Undergoing her sea trails” [trials!] and hence manage expectations.

Grubbie

“At no point was there damage or a breach of the hull”,all sorts of clever tricks to throw us off the scent.Stretching the truth beyond breaking point actually seems to have worked judging by the restrained coverage so far.I have the feeling that the papers will be full of stories about sailors who almost died in the morning though.

Sam

Stretching the truth….are you still looking for the Wreck of HMS Invincible sunk in 1982 Grubbie? I hear Dr Ballard turned down offers to look lol

Airborne

Yaaaawn god you get so boring with your repetive chuff pal. Bet you were clapping your hands all excited and frothing and getting a stiffy with this opportunity to let us know you were right all along and the QE is about to sink/ground/ hit by a missile/capsize due to blah blah/rust/smell or otherwise be crap…..delete insert as appropriate pal. Get the wet wipes and sort yourself out buddy.

Sam

The QEs problems are to be expected…the UK hadnt built any big carriers since the 1950s. Her defensive armaments might be a bit lackluster (Primarily due to her tiny escort fleet) but its her Aircraft will decide how good she is, I worry a lot more about the F35 than the QE

Grubbie

I’m not hoping it will fail, youre hoping it will work.

Sam

Building ships that float is something the UK is good at…..equiping them well enough is a different department and thats were your pessimism should be directed

Rick

Yes Grubbie, captain of the mums underware squad.

Grubbie

Thanks for your technical input

Tom

“Incredibly Complex System”? Yet again showing your ignorance as well as your desire to rubbish anything Navy. HP Salt water is not incredibly complex and pipework failures happen (in houses as well as ships – ask any insurance company investigator). As the salt water is under high pressure a burst pipe results in a lot of water flooding a compartment in a very short time. Additionally, the ladders are made of aluminium and therefore easy to buckle (several “melted” during the Illustrious gearbox fire). This was a minor incident, one dealt with regularly by the RN. In fact before joining a ship ALL crew members have to undertake Firefighting and Damage Control training at Phoenix (for Pompey rates) and train to stop flooding in water that is often neck high and above.

Michael Hernaman

She is awesome, country should be proud (i certainly am), cant wait to see a photo of her with a full compliment of our F35s, and a astute/type 45 next to her, like a task force.

Grubbie

You are going to have to be an extremely patient man.

Rick

that’s right Hernamen!

Sam

Another minor issue hopefully, its not like the carrier was listing badly or anything. Its not as disastrous as the Type 42 Destroyer having a 20 year old radar (Type 965) when launched which screwed the RN in 1982, the County Class Destroyers had the same Radar….now thats what I call serious. (Just to clarify the Type 997 Artisan on the Type 23/26 is still very very capable and was added to the 23 very recently)

Grubbie

That radar actually worked!It’s nowhere near the most shameful weapons system of the Falklands war. That trophy probably goes to the tigerfish torpedo.Its actually quite hard to think of many really successful RN procurements,CAMM looks good so far, big production run and a proper plan.

Sam

965 was useless as it couldnt track targets flying low over land and was the reason why Sea Dart wasnt as effective as it was aboard HMS Exeter which had the Type 1022. Sea slug was hopeless to begin with, Sea Wolf was only on 3 ships and Sea Cat was the only effective missile within San Carlos Bay as the others were RADAR guided and only a few FIM 92 Stingers were available (SAS). 965 had no moving target indicator and was badly affected by TV signals as it ran in the same band. Type 965 Radar AKE2 screwed HMS Coventry as they couldnt track the inbound threats. HMS Broadswords 967/968 radar could occasionally see them. The Argentines exploited the 965s weaknesses as the UK sold them this set in 1975. Tigerfish “wasnt” used because it was allready known to be crap… same with SeaSlug. That radar system was a major factor in the loss of 2 Destroyers

Gunbuster

965 was ineffective. But it was an early warning long range radar.
T42 had 992 which was effective at sea but somewhat ineffective in San carlos or close in to land . It was basically the same radar used as part of the Seawolf radar (967 doppler radar/968 Surface and air search same as 992).
Coventry was screwed when it sailed in front of Broadsword which had a 910 tracker lock and forced the engagement to reset
All the rest, tigerfish, seaslug and to an extent Seacat where carp. The seacat tracker system on T21 (R912) was actually pretty good but let down by an unreliable missile.

Sam

Seacat wasnt unreliable….it functionally was great, its issue was it was subsonic with 5000m range and MCLOS guided or RADAR which as we know not great in San Carlos. Type 21 frigs had GWS 24 Seacat (final version). Coventry crossing Broadsword was unfortunate but they were exectuting a manouver (type 64) that hadnt been trained for before and it went wrong. Good tactic on paper but needed to be practiced. SeaCat might not have been a success at killing enemy targets but it did supress the Argentine Air Force when they executed their attacks. Seacat after all was the most numerous weapon in the SAM armoury at the time. I have always wondered how worse it could have been if none of the task force then had Seacat…It definately needed replacing but in my book rushing the Pilots (As they themselves testified to…they were really fearful of Sea Cat) and putting them off counts in suppression factor 😁. If I remember correctly 992 was replaced when the 1022 was installed with the 993? 😉 Stingers would have been the best if we had more than a few for the SAS at the time. Seacat also required a very high skill level.

Gunbuster

1022 replaced 966/965 bedstead and double bedstead on T42s.
992 was the cigar shaped radome on T42 and T21. It was fitted to T22 in a different radome that contained 967 and 968 . The below decks 968 was pretty much identical to 992 cabinets.
Seacat on T21 was good. Radar tracking TVA/B guidance…it just needed a better missile. As you said though everyone was putting a lot of stuff up to hit and if not hit at least distract the pilots. I was on a Seawolf ship so if we shot we usually hit…but not when the exocet got chewed up.

Sam

On a side note…HMS Yarmouth type 12 frigate with her original GWS 20 Mark 1 Eyeball guided Seacat is credited with shooting down a Skyhawk on May 25 1982 😉 The pilot was rescued by HMS Fearless

Gunbuster

Seacat dustbins! I remember them well!

Dutchy

Is it sinkin’ yet?

Grubbie

Ok, so check out services network. 200t tons of water is a trivial amount for a large ship, but buckled structure is not trivial .”Mental health team stood up” is hard to take seriously, but I wasn’t one of the 3 people allegedly at risk of drowning.Significant leak.

Phillip Johnson

A piping failure is suggestive either of a manufacturing defect or a design fault. Presumably we are talking about the Saltwater Service System if the water flow was high enough to distort structure. That means water around equipment where it is not supposed to be. The real issue is not how much water, it is what it damaged.

Kevin Hastie

No worse than the “internal leaks” our government has!

Sam

Lol Touche 😁😁😁

jon livesey

As a break from the hysteria over an internal leak, I guess the recent news from the Gulf shows why we have a real navy, and why it hasn’t been downgraded to a bunch of fishery protection vessels, as some *extremely* boring and repetitive posters here are fond of demanding.

Rick

Precisely Jon, maratime security across the globe is crucial for an island nation with the world’s 5th largest economy. The posters you’re referring to are clueless.

[…] to its homeport due to an internal water leak which was confirmed by a Royal Navy spokesperson to Save The Royal Navy, an independent online campaign to promote the Royal […]