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Armchair Admiral

This is what makes the RN the best in the world.
A good crew makes any ship more than just the sum of her weapons.
AA

Jon

When the Arrowhead 140 was up for selection, they said that the Iver Huitfeld ships had passed FOST assessment, the implication being that the ship class/build had been assessed as a warship, as well how the crew itself functioned.

When the B2 Rivers were initially trained up, would an assessment have been made of how they might function as a warship, or given that they are OPVs would they be purely assessed for that function? I’ve heard a lot of people deride the Rivers as being built largely to commercial standards. I’ve wondered if that was true and if FOST has commented on it (in the public domain).
When the Arrowhead 140 was up for selection, they said that the Iver Huitfeld ships had passed FOST assessment, the implication being that the ship class/build had been assessed as a warship, as well how the crew itself functioned.

When the B2 Rivers were initially trained up, would an assessment have been made of how they might function as a warship, or given that they are OPVs would they be purely assessed for that function? I’ve heard a lot of people deride the Rivers as being built largely to commercial standards. I’ve wondered if that was true and if FOST or MCTA has commented on it (in the public domain).

Last edited 1 month ago by Jon
Jon

Sorry about the doubling in my question above.

I haven’t found an answer other than an old NATO document referring to the ballistic protection requirements of B1 Rivers being implemented to a “classified UK naval engineering standard”. So it looks like there won’t be much, if anything, in the public domain about the B2 Rivers either. We might as well just look at the pretty paint job.

Geoffrey Hicking

So long as commanders can operate with a minimum of information and use their initiative in all situations. Hopefully “The Rules of the Game” by Andrew Gordon is in some naval library somewhere. As little “Northwood telling submarines what to do” as possible.

Duker

Admiralty has always had a centralised control for remote ships since the days of long distance radio communications

Geoffrey Hicking

It has not always exercised that control, and sometimes leaving things to the commander’s discretion has reaped benefits. Cunningham trusting his subordinates in the Mediterranean is one example.

Harold G Brathwhaite

“the best of the best” Is there actually a League Table to prove that ?

Pmichael

There is a flow chart. Is it British then it’s the best.

Supportive Bloke

There are a huge number of other navies that are bought into FOST.

FOST is a big organisation as a % of total manpower.

The one thing that makes me nervous of what is going in here is the statement “the customer agreed a package of training with FOST”. The whole purpose of FOST was that it was arms length and you never quite knew what was to be thrown at the crew: there was always a crazy.

However, having a crazy thrown in was good as it broadened people’s experience and might well have come in useful if something left field occurred, even when on another posting.

I am concerned that the removal of ‘gratuitous training’ will simply be done to reduce the number of modules of training to budgets.

The revamped FOST was one of the great lessons of ’82 – I really hope that institutional memory has not faded as to why it was so needed.

Sonik

I take your point about cost savings but 82 was a direct attack on the UK and those who participated had no doubt at all about why they were there. The situation today is somewhat different, so I guess the RN need to be realistic about what’s achievable in today’s climate. The days of the press gang are long gone and it’s difficult to recruit and motivate people when they don’t see the point of what they are doing.

Last edited 1 month ago by Ben Robins
Gunbuster

You wont know exactly what you will get with regards to the exercise script. A BDX 1.1 will still have a lot of variables.

As to agreeing a training package I suspect it will be a brave CO who says to FOST “No we dont need to do that training we are good enough at Firex, BDX, CASEX, ADEX etc…” FOST’ ies would make it their personal goal to prove you wrong and to highlight your deficiencies.

Sonik

I’m sure that’s all true but I think you miss my underlying point. Preparing for what, exactly? The mission of the armed forces has gotten highly obfuscated in the last 20 years. That’s the issue here. Fortunately the RN is in a much better place than the Army, in that regard.

Last edited 1 month ago by Ben Robins
Cam

Does the Royal Navy get paid for training other Navy’s, Fost ect? And same with officer training do we get paid as we do train loads of officers, it’s a shame we have cut the number of Officer training places for the British millitay too!

So this is what the yank think of BOST,
When USS Forrest Sherman underwent a short version of BOST in 2012, comments from her sailors included “I’ve been through other exercises, inspections, and deployment and this was by far the hardest … It was even more intense than INSURV

Last edited 1 month ago by Cam
stephen ball

International Training | Royal Navy (mod.uk) Some info there.

My guess nation’s pay depending.

Cam

Cheers

Cam

Spot on

Ron

Does anyone know if the ships of the RN go through a shock test. I see all these nice shiny computer screans and wonder to myself what happens if a explosion goes off close to the ship. There will be a shock wave going through the vessel so can all these computer screans remain operational. Is there a manual back up for example a good old fashioned fire control table and rangefinders for guns. I know it sounds old fashioned but it works and works under battle conditions.

I know I might sound stupid but I have asked myself the question, Would it be an idea to have the combat control centre built independent of the ship and connected to the ship via hydraulic shock absorbers. Basically a box in a box on hydraulics.

Jon

QintetiQ runs a shock test simulation facility in Rosyth that simulates explosions for ship and sub equipment.

This guy’s twitter feed has some photos of Royal Navy ships undergoing the more visually exciting shock testing by setting off nearby explosions.

There’s a set of NATO shock protection standards (STANAG 4142, 4137 and 4549) that RN and other allied warships meet.

Last edited 1 month ago by Jon
Ron

Thanks Jon.

Cam

How many boats does HMS QE carry? I seen a RIB aboard above, how many does she carry anyone know?

X

There are 4 boats and 3 are carried.

Cam

only 3 carried? That include Ribs?

Cam

whats the biggest boats she can carry u know? I was just thinking of a biggish Royal marine craft and possible Raids from HMS QE from choppers and boat if needed.

BobM

do we know anything about Russian and/or Chinese equivalent to FOST? aren’t their personnel mostly still conscripts? we can look all we want at platforms and their capabilities but, as has been said, it’s the sailors who fight the ship.