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Ian Ross

Sadly it is difficult to see the economic case for keeping yards open solely to build warships, to be a serious shipbuilding nation, there has to be a large commercial shipbuilding market to enable the economics to work. The alternative is to nationalise the remaining shipbuilding facilities on the understanding that it is a national capability that is being retained regardless of expense. I very much doubt there is any political will in the UK to do that in the present.

L test engineer

Still building the second OPV at Appledore!

NavyLookout

Apologies @L Test Engineer The second OPV is still indeed building at Appledore with a third on order.

Trevor Hollingsbee

A third Irish OPV has recently been ordered from Babcock-owned Appledore. This is a very capable yard, revamped in the 1990s to build the LSLs before Labour, disastrously, handed the contract to Swan Hunter, for political reasons (not many Labour votes in Devon). Cammell Laird and A&P can also build warship hulls of course.

Trevor Hollingsbee

And of course BAE’s Barrow yard can also build surface ships if required.

NavyLookout

Building surface ships at Barrow maybe theoretically possible but the yard will be at full capacity for many years completing the Astute programme and the Trident submarine replacements. It would also require considerable investment and re-skilling as Barrow is a dedicated submarine construction site now.

John

Why should BAE tout for business abroad you may ask? Simple…..with just one yard and the knowledge it has the guarantee to build all future RN warships and if no orders are placed the Government has to pay them compensation to keep them ticking over until such times orders are placed. Cushty little number eh?

Trevor Hollingsbee

Very difficult for BAE to compete with continental European yards which are government owned, and/ or subsidised by huge gouts of taxpayers money, and not, unlike BAE, bound by draconian anti-corruption legislation created, to the unconcealed delight of our competitors, by people with little knowledge of how the real world operates.

Trevor Hollingsbee

Interesting also to note that A&P and Cammell Laird remain heavily involved with aircraft carrier construction, while A & P are building submarine sections for BAE.